BEHRINGER FX2000 PDF

For performing musicians and engineers: stagecraft, engineering and gear. I have a small portable studio for singing, I need something for my microphone.. But I would ask something before buy, does someone tested it? Thank you a lot!

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Recording artists, musicians, and studio technicians rely on signal processors to obtain the perfect tone from voices and instruments alike. Choosing the right signal processor can help create a definitive sound that brings out the essence of your music, yet many musicians have not considered the fundamental role that they actually play.

We decided to provide you with information on the importance of selecting signal processors, along with our picks for the top processors on the market. We looked for products delivering great sound quality, letting you effectively process vocals and a variety of instruments, and giving you the most for your money. Buy from Amazon. With the features in the filter, sound dynamics, modulations, and other effects categories, you could use the FX for vocals and any instruments you want on a given recording, and it will still sound good.

Even for musicians with years of playing, teaching, or recording under their belt, finding an ideal signal processor can still be difficult. We know that signal processors are sometimes unfamiliar territory for experienced and new musicians alike, so we made sure to develop an article that you can trust. Our commitment to giving you accurate information on signal processors starts with our transparent approach to developing this list.

We have direct experience with recording practices and using signal processors to achieve desired sounds across all types of genres, from classical to funk, and hard rock to hip-hop. We drew on our gear knowledge and personal experiences as musicians.

First, we looked at the different kinds of signal processors that musicians and studio technicians currently locate on the market. We went through the list to check which processors could have an appeal to a broad range of users and certain users with niche needs, placing emphasis on the sound, ease of use, and functions that each device provided for its cost. We also asked technicians, musicians, and music teachers about the current crop of processors to see which ones they used and liked.

This input helped us compile a shorter list of the top signal processors. We tested some processors with a very helpful recording technician, and spent a few more hours talking with our sources to get more specific impressions and details on the best processors.

Our research, experiences, questions, and discussions have helped create a list packed with information you can trust. Every musician needs an entry-level understanding of what signal processors do before actually using them. Our explanation of signal processing makes use of information from a great introductory summary by Robert Dennis , an expert recording technician.

Also, for a more detailed discussion on the technical aspects of processing, check out this helpful Youtube video. Even if you did not realize it at the time, you have come across audio signals in music before. Even when you listen to your favorite song on your iPod or phone, you are hearing a recorded audio signal. When you hear any sound, you are perceiving a sound wave that your brain processes.

Sound waves are transmitted physically, but they can also be encoded electrically, as electromagnetic waves. So, you can think of audio signals as electrical messages that encode sound. These messages can be represented in two main ways: analog and digital. To give an example, an analog signal with a high frequency will correspond to a sound wave that also has a high frequency, which you would perceive as a higher-pitched note than a low-frequency sound.

Digital signals as also described in a Wikipedia article , represent and transmit sounds in a binary format. A high musical note does not need to have a higher electrical frequency when transmitted digitally, for example. Both digital and analog signals require signal processing during recording. Signal processors are devices that change the audio signals passing through them. They may filter out unwanted frequencies or attenuate certain levels of sound.

Certain processors can add effects to a signal, such as repeating the signal at a lower volume slightly after its first pass, to add a delay effect. Processors used in recording usually accomplish numerous effects so that the user can make any desired changes to their instrumental or vocal input before the sound is actually recorded.

That way, users can make sure the sound they want reflects the actual signal that they will record, have a good idea of what the recording will sound like, and limit the amount of post-production required. You can change audio signals in a practically infinite number of ways, but there are a few main categories of processing functions that exist.

Not every signal processor will offer every possible processing option, but most will deliver at least the basics of equalization, dynamics, and delay-type effects. Depending on what music you wish to record, and which instruments you will be recording, you might want to look for processors capable of changing your sounds in other ways, as well. Several signal processor functions are relevant to recording music:.

The user can reduce the gain of a frequency to decrease the output amplitude, and thus, the volume of that frequency. The result is reductions or complete eliminations of certain frequencies of sound; for example, high frequencies can be reduced when recording a cello or electric bass. Alternately, the user may increase the gain of a frequency, increasing its amplitude and audio volume relative to other frequencies. This way, a desired frequency range, for example, midrange frequencies when recording vocals, piano, or a lead guitar, can be emphasized in the signal output.

Decreasing gain on high-amplitude signals compresses, or reduces, the volume of the output sound when the input signal reaches a certain level. Increasing gain for low-amplitude signals can increase the volume of the quiet sounds in a recording. Repetition at a different harmonic frequency can create a chorus effect, for example.

Distortion can change the timbre or sound profile of the audio signal by altering its basic waveform properties. Input signals are altered according to algorithms that change how a given input wave behaves, for example, by adding new frequencies to an input sound to create a harmony. Modulation may encompass features like creating timed decreases and increases in amplitude for a tremolo effect.

Signal processors offer numerous benefits to everyone involved in recording music, from the performers to the technicians and producers. Increasing the gain on desired frequencies and amplitudes, and placing filters on unwanted frequencies and amplitudes through equalization and dynamic processing can ensure that undesirable tones or audio qualities are not recorded. Also, these features help you avoid recording outside sounds accidentally.

Processing with different types of filters help you avoid those types of outcomes. Your band might have a sound mix down perfectly in your practice space or at a small venue, but keeping your effects and amplifier settings the same will not necessarily give you the same sound when you record.

Compression, gating, and expansion processing help recordings capture quiet parts of your songs, and keep the loudest parts from becoming clipped and distorted on the recording. Equalization can help your piano or vocals sound the same on your demo mp3s as they do when you play live for an audience. When you are playing music at home, in a music class, or with a band, you and your other listeners experience echoes and reverberation from the acoustics of your environment. When these environmental effects are not present, you might be surprised to hear how different your music sounds.

Delay, reverberation, and echo effects can add a sense of depth or fullness that a recording might otherwise lack. You can also add effects like choruses or flange to change how your instruments sound, or replicate the same effects that you might create through your amplifier, synthesizer accessories, or effects pedals.

View on Amazon. The Virtualizer 3D FX Multi-Engine FX Processor, made by Behringer, is our choice for the best signal processor that can find a place in a home recording setup or a professional studio. While professional studio techs may already have a multi-purpose processor like the Virtualizer 3D FX, we found a lot to like about this unit, and only a couple of downsides. Our brief test recording session with this processor sounded great.

The FX allows for digital to analog conversions and back again, but we did not notice a significant loss in sound quality even when using analog inputs to digital outputs. The processor features that we tried did what they were supposed to, and we liked that Behringer included a variety of features.

The de-esser effectively took out the hiss from recording vocals, while the gate and expander effects let us record a drum track without picking up the random noises we made in the background to test the features out.

The filter, sound dynamics, modulations, and other effects categories contain a lot of features. You could use the FX for vocals and any instruments you want on a given recording, and it will still sound good. The inclusion of pitch shifting, tape echo, and vocoder effects even encourages some experimentation, as you can look for new sounds that you would not normally consider.

Depending on what you want to record, you might need to buy a separate preamp. We only noticed a recording quality issue with a computer-programmed rhythm track routed through the MIDI input. The recorded track sounded quieter than the original, even though we did not filter any frequencies or add effects. Our rhythm track might have been affected by this small issue. The display is large and easy to read. I know that some technicians like to keep a dim studio, so the bright display would be handy in those environments.

We talked to a couple musicians who use the FX in home recordings, and they said that they could filter and equalize signals easily. However, you can expect to spend a lot of time navigating the different processor and effects options with repetitive button pressing and knob tweaking. The musicians we spoke with said that, even after using this processor for months, they would occasionally trigger the wrong effects if they were not paying careful attention, especially if they were just trying to turn on basic preset effects like reverb.

The FX could be a great system for learning the basics of signal processing in recording, and one recording school instructor we spoke with used it for that purpose.

If you have only begun to learn about recording, and are still figuring out your effects from your EQ, then you will definitely need to spend some time with this processor.

You will not unlock all of its possibilities in a day or two, and the interface issues we mentioned above makes the learning curve a bit steeper. Credit: Universal Audio, Inc. For the recording professional with years of experience, we recommend the Universal Audio LA Mk II as our runner-up for consistently delivering a warm, classic analog sound.

Instead, the LA Mk II is optimal for highly experienced audiophiles, regardless of whether they are recording artists, producers, or studio technicians, who crave an authentic analog sound on their recordings. We liked several features, but also found a couple of caveats.

It is fully analog, so you can record analog input without any unwanted distortion from conversion between different audio formats. They also praised the ability to achieve the same sounds as classic recordings that inspired them to play music in the first place. We listened to organ, guitar, drum, and vocal tracks processed through the LA Mk II, and they sounded warm and full, without any hissing, popping, or background noise.

We were enthusiastic about the design layout, Every feature is independently controlled, so you can make any changes you want on the fly, without navigating menus or continuously hitting buttons.

We could see where this would make it excellent for live recordings, or minimizing the time spent getting the right tone before a take. The features deliver effective control over dynamics and equalization.

Everyone we spoke to about the LA Mk II praised it, and the compression abilities especially sounded good to us.

The changes in volume on the recordings we heard did not clip or sound too muted. However, you will need to buy or own additional components if you heavily rely on delay, reverb, chorus, and other effects in your recordings, because the LA Mk II does not offer them.

Credit: TC-Helicon. This device is fully digital, sits on the floor with step-operated controls, and was designed mostly for vocal processing and recording only, rather than instruments. The design seems like it was intended for use not only with recording, but live vocal performances, which is why the core effects such as delay, gate, dynamics, and equalization options can be activated or adjusted by the foot switches.

As a digital processor, it also offers a number of other effects like delay, harmonization, reverb, distortion, and the ever-present pitch shift, so that you can autotune yourself.

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Behringer Virtualizer 3D FX2000 Multi-Engine FX Processor

Slight delays due to high demand may be possible, but we remain fully operational. Stay healthy! This amazing rack-mountable FX unit has 71 incredible algorithms, including true studio-grade stereo and 3D effects that will add a head-spinning new dimension to your sound, both live and in the studio. Effects options include powerful modulation, amp simulation, distortion and special effects, as well as effective dynamic and psychoacoustics processing. Performance is further enhanced through user-addressable high and low EQ and wave-adaptive Virtual Room reverbs. You are free to edit up to 7 parameters per preset, and then save them for future use in the provided memory locations. Standard Reverbs Cathedral Dense, long reverb of a large cathedral - often used on solo instruments and vocals Gold Plate Simulates the sound of plate reverberators - a classic for drums snare and vocals Small Hall Simulates a small, lively strongly reflecting performance hall Room Simulates the sound of reflections from the walls of a room Studio Effectively creates the reverberation of a small to mid-sized room Concert Recreates the sound reflection of a small theater or large hall Stage Well suited for dissipating the sound of a keyboard or acoustic guitar Spring Reverb Simulates the sound of the classic spring reverb Ambience Reproduces the sound of a room impression without late reflections Early Reflections Generates the clearly audible, initial reflections of a room.

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[Question] Behringer FX2000 Virtualizer 3D

Recording artists, musicians, and studio technicians rely on signal processors to obtain the perfect tone from voices and instruments alike. Choosing the right signal processor can help create a definitive sound that brings out the essence of your music, yet many musicians have not considered the fundamental role that they actually play. We decided to provide you with information on the importance of selecting signal processors, along with our picks for the top processors on the market. We looked for products delivering great sound quality, letting you effectively process vocals and a variety of instruments, and giving you the most for your money. Buy from Amazon. With the features in the filter, sound dynamics, modulations, and other effects categories, you could use the FX for vocals and any instruments you want on a given recording, and it will still sound good.

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Behringer FX2000 3D FX Processor

Thomann is the largest online and mail order retailer for musical instruments, light and sound equipment worldwide, having about 10m customers in countries and 80, products on offer. We are musicians ourselves and share your passion for making it. As a company, we have a single objective: making you, our customer, happy. We have a wide variety of pages giving information and enabling you to contact us before and after your purchase. Alternatively, please feel free to use our accounts on social media such as Facebook or Twitter to get in touch.

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