BUBISHI KARATE PDF

I started with my karate training in traditional shotokan club. Back then, karate was meant for self-defense, wherefore kata was principle method of training. However, several years later, I began to realize that a new, competitive karate, was taking place. Wining medals became the goal and gyako tsuki became main technique, without even thinking of self-defense, while kata practice was considered unnecessary. Soon, karate became empty — to commercial and without essence. Only then did I realize that I knew nothing at all.

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The Bubishi is a collection of essays that deal with philosophical ideals tied to the martial arts, metaphysics, medicine, training methods and techniques, as well as a bit of history. At this point, it might make sense to take a step back and recognize the incredible breadth of knowledge within China at the time.

To put it into context, another martial tome, also called the Bubishi, was put together at roughly the same time by a Chinese general named Mao Yuanyi. His manual cites over 2, books, contains chapters over nine volumes, and touches on every imaginable aspect of warfare - unarmed, armed, armies, skirmishes, descriptions of kung fu techniques taken from an even earlier document written by a master named Qi Jiguan, who nobody has heard of outside of scholarly circles China and Okinawa have a long history together, dating back to the early 14th century, just before the establishment of what would become the Ryukyu Kingdom.

Imperial emissaries from China would pass through the islands from time to time, fishermen and traders would make the trip back and forth, and Okinawan scions were sent to the Chinese Mainland to receive a proper education. Martial knowledge could have been passed along at any time during those centuries, but for us, the most critical time period is just after the fall of Ming dynasty , when loyalists fled the burning ruins of the Shaolin Temple, and scattered across the newly formed Qing Empire.

According to the many legends bouncing around dojos across the world, one of these fleeing exiles was a kung fu master named Fang Zhonggong, who made his way to Fujian, on the southern coast of China. Fujian faces Taiwan and Okinawa, and has long been the jump off point for adventurous Chinese, as well as something of a haven for defeated rebels.

Martial artists from the Shaolin Temple, like Fang, gathered here and created a community that would eventually give rise to the Southern Shaolin Temple, Wing Chun and, important to our story, White Crane style kung fu.

While plotting, she saw two cranes fighting by the riverside. White Crane kung fu split into a dozen component parts, Whooping Crane, Jumping Crane and several others, and spread out across Fujian and into the seas between China and Okinawa. The Okinawans then mixed the Chinese styles and their interpretation of the Bubishi manual with their own highly developed indigenous martial arts, and created proto-karate.

There were also many Chinese families in Okinawa at the time 36, according to legend and they also practiced martial arts. That community may also have passed on bits and pieces of what eventually became the Bubishi. However the transmission happened, the result was an entirely new martial art, based upon Chinese traditions, but already morphing into a unique style when the Meiji Restoration put a militaristic regime in place in Japan, and Okinawa already occupied for centuries by Japanese forces became an official part of the Japanese Empire.

The Japanese had already developed kendo and judo Way of the Sword, Way of the Hand and for them the Chinese-Okinawan hybrid karate-jutsu, as it was often referred to, need to be made Japanese. A quick recap: Shaolin exiles bring their kung fu to Fujian; one of them sees cranes fight and develops White Crane; contact between China and Ryukyu result in the transmission of White Crane and the Bubishi, karate-jutsu is born; Japan sees the value in this Chinese-influenced island fighting style, and co-opt it into their own martial tradition, calling it karate-do.

When post-WWII Korean martial artists were seeking to organize their own martial style into a coherent system, they looked to Okinawa and the Bubishi. The karate forms from the islands became a foundation for what would eventually become Taekwondo, another martial art that has swept the world, and has seeped into the mixed martial arts kicking game - high kicks, front kicks, spinning back kicks, side kicks But that is another story for another time.

There is little resemblance between the Shaolin Five Ancestors kung fu and modern karate, let alone modern Taekwondo.

At every step of the way, starting with the initial flight from the burning temple in , the martial art has changed, and been adapted to the environment, the people, and the times. At the center of this constantly evolving tradition is a bible, the Bubishi, one of the sole constants over the centuries, yet itself an enigma cobbled together from old sources, copied down by uncomprehending disciples, interpreted differently by every master who manages to read its pages.

But that too is another story, for another time. Videos Words Photos About. White Crane becomes Karate China and Okinawa have a long history together, dating back to the early 14th century, just before the establishment of what would become the Ryukyu Kingdom. Karate-jutsu becomes Karate-do The Japanese had already developed kendo and judo Way of the Sword, Way of the Hand and for them the Chinese-Okinawan hybrid karate-jutsu, as it was often referred to, need to be made Japanese.

Written by: Sascha Matuszak. Like Fightland. Follow us on Tumblr. Subscribe on YouTube.

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Karate's Sacred Tome: The Bubishi and the Evolution of Martial Arts

Being a historian and collector, I have come to own some of the rarer and more beautiful books which have been published on the martial arts. Some provide a thousand bizarre techniques of questionable efficacy—like Mas Oyama's Advanced Karate— while others provide a fascinating insight on a point in history or the development of an individual fighter—such as Georges Carpentier's My Methods: Boxing as a Fine Art. Frankly, it's just gotten to the point that if I hear about a martial arts publication I didn't know about, I make it my mission for the week to procure it and devour its contents. I am often asked by readers for a definitive reading list which I believe everyone invested in this pastime should study, and I often end up feeling like I've done a very incomplete job with my reply.

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Okinawan Bubishi – What did karate look like before 1900?

The Bubishi is a collection of essays that deal with philosophical ideals tied to the martial arts, metaphysics, medicine, training methods and techniques, as well as a bit of history. At this point, it might make sense to take a step back and recognize the incredible breadth of knowledge within China at the time. To put it into context, another martial tome, also called the Bubishi, was put together at roughly the same time by a Chinese general named Mao Yuanyi. His manual cites over 2, books, contains chapters over nine volumes, and touches on every imaginable aspect of warfare - unarmed, armed, armies, skirmishes, descriptions of kung fu techniques taken from an even earlier document written by a master named Qi Jiguan, who nobody has heard of outside of scholarly circles China and Okinawa have a long history together, dating back to the early 14th century, just before the establishment of what would become the Ryukyu Kingdom. Imperial emissaries from China would pass through the islands from time to time, fishermen and traders would make the trip back and forth, and Okinawan scions were sent to the Chinese Mainland to receive a proper education.

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Interpreting the Bubishi: One Thousand Pounds Falls to the Ground

Editor's Note: This is the first in a three part series on the bubishi. Part 2 will discuss the text and its impact on Okinawan karate. Part 3 will discuss the availability of translations of the text in English, the text's impact on karate today and the current status of research on this text. It is an obscure martial arts text written in Chinese. But, it was a most cherished possession of many of the great founders of modern karate -- something that was meticulously hand copied and shared among only their most trusted students. The bubishi's age and the origin are unknown. Yet, while the text remains a mystery, it is also the only historical written record of martial techniques and theory to have emerged from karate's shrouded past.

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